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The working language of the conference is English with translation available into Russian for some sessions.

Wednesday 13th, February

19:00 - 22:00   Connect @ Hofburg
Hofburg, Wintergarten

Thursday 14th, February

8:00 - 9:00   Registration
Hofburg, 1st floor, Segmentgalerie
9:00 - 10:15   Opening Plenary Session
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Neuer Saal
10:15 - 11:00   Coffee break / Presentation of RFoM Publications
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Cafeteria
11:00 - 12:30
Session 1
  Blocking and filtering practices and policies
Bibliotheksaal, 5th floor
New media services
Room 525, 5th floor
Social media, social activity and media freedom
Segmentgalerie, 1st floor
12:30 - 14:00   Lunch
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Cafeteria
14:00 - 15:30
Session 2
  Freedom of expression - rights and responsibilities
Bibliotheksaal, 5th floor
Hateful speech - ban, tolerate or challenge?
Room 525, 5th floor
The future of copyright online
Segmentgalerie, 1st floor
15:30 - 16:00   Coffee break
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Cafeteria
16:00 - 17:30
Session 3
  Comments on news sites
Bibliotheksaal, 5th floor
Freedom of expression of minorities in a digital age
Room 525, 5th floor
Today's news is social
Segmentgalerie, 1st floor
17:30 - 19:30   Reception
Hofburg, Wintergarten

Friday 15th, February

9:30 - 11:00
Session 4
  Protection of minors

In co-operation with the Institute for European Media Law

Bibliotheksaal, 5th floor
Internet self-regulation - how does it work?
Room 525, 5th floor
The Multi-Stakeholder Approach to Internet Governance
Segmentgalerie, 1st floor
11:00 - 11:30   Coffee break
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Cafeteria
11:30 - 13:00   Plenary Session - Statements from the OSCE Delegations
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Neuer Saal
13:00 - 13:45   Closing Remarks by Dunja Mijatović, OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Neuer Saal
13:45 - 15:00   Farewell Reception
Hofburg, 2nd floor, Cafeteria

Opening Plenary Session

Neuer Saal (09:00 - 10:15)

Welcoming Remarks

Ambassador Ihor Prokopchuk, Chairman of the Permanent Council, Permanent Representative of the Permanent Mission of Ukraine to the OSCE

Ambassador Lamberto Zannier, OSCE Secretary General

Dunja Mijatović, OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media

Keynote Speakers

Dawn Nunziato, Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

Yaroslav Skvortsov, Dean of the School of International Journalism, Moscow State Institute of International Relations

 

Social media, social activity and media freedom

Session 1 (11:00 - 12:30)
Segmentgalerie

How should principles and standards of freedom of expression be applied in practice, given the complex information environment on the Internet? Social network platforms have accelerated the pace of protest movements, and recent clashes between authoritarian governments and tech- savvy protesters have also shown the restrictions of freedom of expression through and on the Internet. Governments have sponsored Internet freedom projects, including software that enables activists to break through firewalls imposed by oppressive governments. Every day, more than one million people use online tools to circumvent extensive blocking programs and government surveillance. To what extent can a free Internet prompt regime change and when is it perceived as fostering destabilization of national security and sovereignty? Is there a definitive line between national security and the right of users to receive and disseminate information anonymously?

Moderator: Jillian York, Director for International Freedom of Expression Global Voices, Electronic Frontier Foundation

Panelists:

 

New Media Services?

Session 1 (11:00 - 12:30)
Room 525

What are the challenges of regulating not only traditional broadcasting but also new media services such as catch up TV or other on-demand services? Where must regulation stop because of the right to freedom of information? Where is regulation needed in order to promote public interests such as pluralism and diversity of content and/or services? How to balance public and commercial interests through regulation within the limits set by human rights? What, if anything, changes in how we look at these questions for new media services (as opposed to traditional broadcasting)?

Moderator: Emmanuelle Machet, Secretary, European Platform of Regulatory Authorities (EPRA)

Panelists:

  • Jean-François Furnémont, Chair, European Platform of Regulatory Authorities (EPRA)
  • Susanne Nikoltchev, Head of Department for Legal Information, European Audiovisual Observatory/Council of Europe
  • Ross Biggam, Director General, Association of Commercial Television, Belgium
  • Tim Suter, Managing Director, Perspective Associates
 

Blocking and Filtering - practices and policies

Session 1 (11:00 - 12:30)
Bibliotheksaal

The Internet is a global infrastructure that enables the free flow of information across borders. Apart from opening up new possibilities, the rapidly growing traffic on the Internet has also brought about hateful and even illegal content. Blocking and filtering are often considered to be solutions to this phenomenon. This raises a number of legal, human rights and technical questions. Should minimum principles on ethics, accuracy and personal rights be established? If so, how could this be achieved without infringing on freedom of speech and editorial freedom? This session endeavours to assess consequences of filtering or blocking on media freedom.

Moderator: Matthias Traimer, Head of the Media and Information Society Division, Austrian Federal Chancellery

Panelists:

  • Yaman Akdeniz, Professor of Law, Faculty of Law, Istanbul Bilgi University
  • Sanja Tatic Kelly, Project Director, Freedom on the Net, Freedom House, Washington
  • Asomudin Atoev, Chairman, Association of Internet Providers in Tajikistan
  • Robert Guerra, Senior Advisor, Citizen Lab, Munk Centre for Global Affairs, University of Toronto
 

Freedom of Expression - Rights and Responsibilities

Session 2 (14:00 - 15:30)
Bibliotheksaal

Freedom of expression is a cornerstone to any democratic society, and in July 2012 the UN Human Rights Council stated in a resolution that freedom of expression applies online just as it does offline. However, some argue that recent cases demonstrate that freedom of the media can be abused to humiliate values and beliefs. Others argue that freedom of expression, a core value of any democracy, must be defended even when that means letting those we disagree with have their say. Again, others argue that there are instances where freedom of expression should be restricted to common justice. How to defend freedom of expression when blasphemous speech allegedly offends 'public morality' or is said to impact the national or regional security?

Moderator: Lee Hibbard, Coordinator for Information Sociaety & Internet Governance, Information Society Unit, Council of Europe

Panelists:

  • Daniel Baer, Deputy Assistant Secretary Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, USA
  • Miklos Haraszti, Former OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, Writer, Media Expert
  • Olof Ehrenkrona, Senior Adviser to the Swedish Foreign Minister
  • Marco Pancini, Senior Policy Counsel, Google
  • Janez Lenarčič, Director, OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR)
  • Lionel Veer, Human Rights Ambassador, Netherlands
 

Hateful speech - ban, tolerate or challenge?

Session 2 (14:00 - 15:30)
Room 525

Is there a universal definition to "hate speech" and should such speech when expressed online be blocked, banned, sanctioned, or challenged? Or is the issue far more complex and requires us to judge on a case by case basis? Are more than legal restrictions needed and should solutions be culture sensitized rather than general? Is it possible to combine universal freedom of expression standards and cultural sensitivities? Where are the limits of someone's right to freedom of opinion and right to free expression online? How can we effectively and swiftly counter hateful speech without restricting the free flow of information on the Internet?

Moderator: Ženet Mujić, Senior Adviser, Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media

  • Peter Molnar, Central European University, Center for Media and Communication Studies, Budapest, will present a study on hate speech

Panelists:

  • Guy Berger, Director of Freedom of Expression and Media Development, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
  • Floriane Hohenberg, Head of Tolerance and Non-Discrimination, OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights
  • Divina Frau-Meigs, Professor, Paris-Sorbonne University, France
  • Nico van Eijk, Professor of Media and Telecommunications Law, University of Amsterdam
  • Helena Mandić, Director of Broadcasting, Communications Regulatory Agency, Bosnia and Herzegovina
 

Session 2 (14:00 - 15:30)
Segmentgalerie

This session raises questions pertaining to recent debates regarding intellectual property rights. On 4 July 2012, the European Parliament rejected ACTA in a plenary session, since the intended benefits of this international agreement were considered far outweighed by the potential threats to civil liberties. SOPA, PIPA and ACTA (among others) all demonstrate the need to reassess the design and scope for intellectual property rights in the digital age; a more comprehensive understanding whereby fundamental rights such as freedom of expression are guaranteed and copyright proportionately protected within a civil rights framework. What could such an approach look like in the OSCE region? The dynamic mix of panelists will help shed light to some aspects of the complexity of copyright in the digital age.

Moderator: Marietje Schaake, Member of the European Parliament

Panelists:

 

Today's news is social

Session 3 (16:00 - 17:30)
Segmentgalerie

This session will take a look at the changing landscape of journalism in the digital age. Web 2.0 applications and social media combine different technologies and open up new ways to share information online. They serve as tools to seek, receive and disseminate information for journalists and citizens alike. The 'audience' now has all tools at hand to produce journalistic and media like content. At the same time, professional journalists are also increasingly relying on social media to publish and to gather data, e.g. through crowd sourcing. The panel will elaborate on the role of social media for citizen reporting and professional media.

Moderator: Christian Möller, Expert, Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media

Panelists:

  • Anna Kachkaeva, Professor, Dean of the Media Communication Department, National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Moscow
  • Leonard Novy, Co-director of the Institute of Media and Communications Policy, Berlin/Germany
  • Filip Wallberg, Journalistic Lecturer, South Danish University, Odense
  • Liz Henry, Bugmaster, Mozilla
  • Timothy Karr, Campaign Director, Free Press
 

Freedom of expression of minorities in a digital age

Session 3 (16:00 - 17:30)
Room 525

This session will give a general account of the specificities regarding freedom of expression for minorities.

Specific focuses will be placed on:

  1. The role of public service media, including an acknowledgement of the importance of other types of media and actors in the online environment.
  2. Cultural and linguistic questions.
  3. Questions of tolerance and participation.

Moderator: Tarlach McGonagle, Professor, Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam

Panelists:

  • Knut Vollebaek, OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities
  • Gavan Titley, University Lecturer, Centre for Media Studies, National University of Ireland, Maynooth
  • Myria Georgiou, Director of Graduate Studies, Media and Communications, London School of Economics
  • Tom Moring, Professor, University of Helsinki
  • Bea Bodrogi, Head of CivilMedia, Hungary
 

Comments on news sites

Session 3 (16:00 - 17:30)
Bibliotheksaal

The existing practice of allowing anonymous comments on online news sites has been problematic. Comments sections are sometimes packed with personal attacks and hateful content. Some newspapers have moved in stages toward requiring users to register before posting comments, providing personal information that is confidentially maintained. Many rely on preliminary moderation of readers' chat rooms. What are best practices, and how do large online media outlets deal with this?

Moderator: Mark Johnson, Community Editor/Internet and Society, The Economist

Panelists:

 

The Multi-Stakeholder Approach to Internet Governance

Session 4 (9:30 - 11:00)
Segmentgalerie

This session will discuss how to foster and nurture a multi-stakeholder approach toward Internet governance; enabling openness, freedom of expression and access to information. It will assess the outcomes of the ITU 2012 World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) and a possible expansion of the scope of international telecommunication regulations. The session will also take into account the progress and future of the UN Internet Governance Forum (IGF).

Moderator: Doug Griffin, Director, Albany Associates

Panelists:

  • Paul Conneally, Head of Communications & Partnership Promotion Division, International Telecommunications Union
  • Wolfgang Kleinwächter, Professor, University of Aarhus
  • Katrin Nyman Metcalf, Professor, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn Law School, Chair of Law and Technology
  • Brett Solomon, Executive Director, Access Now
  • Uladzimir Rabavolau, First Deputy Head of the Operational and Analytical Centre under the Aegis of the President of the Republic of Belarus
  • Jermyn Brooks, Independent Chair, Global Network Initiative
 

Internet self-regulation - how does it work?

Session 4 (9:30 - 11:00)
Room 525

The term 'media self-regulation' refers to the implementation of mechanisms drafted by and for media professionals aimed at upholding the quality, responsibility and credibility of journalism. Media self-regulation has proven to be an essential safeguard of media freedom since it enables to preserve its editorial independence, and minimize political interference and legal constraints. With the rapid development of online media, it appears essential to discuss if and what spheres of the Internet should be self-regulated and to what extent existing media ethics is suitable for today's and tomorrow's news outlets. How are existing media self-regulation mechanisms adapting to the Internet?

Moderator: Joan Barata, Communication Law and Vice Dean of International Relations at the Blanquerna Communication School (Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona)

  • Adeline Hulin, Project Co-ordinator, Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, will present the RFoM Guidebook on Internet Self-regulation

Panelists:

 

Protection of minors in the online environment
in co-operation with the Institute for European Media Law

Session 4 (9:30 - 11:00)
Bibliotheksaal

While the Internet brings considerable benefits to children's education and development, it also exposes them to online risks such as access to inappropriate content, abusive interaction with others, exposure to aggressive marketing practices and privacy issues and other risks. What are regulatory approaches to protection of minors online can be used while not restricting freedom of expression?

The session will discuss:

  1. National and European self-/co-regulatory and educational initiatives
  2. Current approaches to protection of minors in video-on-demand services
  3. Rights of the child to access information
  4. Protection of private life
  5. Parents' rights to freely educate their children.

Moderator: Alexander Scheuer, General Manager, Institute of European Media Law (EMR)

Panelists:

 

Closing Plenary Session

Friday Session 4 (11:30 - 13.45)
Neuer Saal

Closing remarks by Dunja Mijatović, OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media

Moderator: Ambassador Ihor Prokopchuk, Chairman of the Permanent Council, Permanent Representative of the Permanent Mission of Ukraine to the OSCE